Categories
Creative process

The Whereabouts of a Wanderer

Gracious Peeps:

My daughter is in need of a context where she will find appreciation for her unique artistic and philosophical leanings.  So she’s chosen WordPress.   Asking my followers to support her in getting her blog started.

Grace and Peace,

Andy

via I was wondering by happenstance the whereabouts of a wanderer.

Categories
Creative process Piano technology

For Someone?

Starting up the blog again, I’m trying to get a piano piece to you guys and going through the more-than-usual frustrations.   All I can say is, all of these new-fangled devices AKA smartphones are for the birds.   I wish it were 1975, I wish there were a Teac 3340-S and a rotary telephone.  Not to mention an Underwood manual typewriter.   All this modern-day technology can go take a hike.

That ranted, I’ll be with you at some point between now and tomorrow morning, even if I have to re-record my version of Lennon-McCartney’s “For No One.”   Sure turned out good except for the hands are chopped off, and it mysteriously ends about five measures before it really ends.

Maybe I should marry a techo-nerd and take the load off.   In fact, a nerd from Canada would be a good idea.  (A redhead, preferably.) I’m close enough to the border anyway, I hear there’s a nice community of Vietnam draft-dodgers still extant in Nelson, and recent events are givin’ me a hankerin’ to Trump-dodge, if you get my meaning.

On a brighter note, Mitch Romney, you ROCK.   Let’s hope my “For No One” is “For Some One” very soon.   Andy OUT.

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Categories
Creative process

Time Off

I’m taking a week off from blogging due to personal issues.   God willing, I’ll be back next Thursday.   Hope to see you all then.  

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Categories
Artist Creative process Musical Piano

Troubled Water

My improvisations toward — and away from — the classic themes of “Bridge Over Troubled Water” by Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel.   Unlike recent recordings done with an iPhone 10, this one was made using my pastor Norman’s old Motorola.   It gives it a nice effect — I hope you like it.   

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Categories
Berkeley Creative process philosophy

Tuesday Tuneup 69

Q. What’s going on inside?

A. Processing, as always.

Q. Processing thoughts?

A. Yes.

Q. Where are these thoughts formed?

A. In the mind.

Q. Not in the brain?

A. No.  They are processed in the brain, but formed in the mind.

Q. And where is the mind?

A. In the Beyond.

Q. Head in the clouds, I see.   So what else happens to thoughts in the mind?

A. Glad you asked.   Besides thought formation, three other activities occur, as pertain to thought.

Q. What are they?

A. Identification, application, and preservation.

Q. How is a thought identified?

A. When it is completed and defined.  You see, all thoughts have the power to merge with other thoughts.  When two thoughts merge, they become a new thought consisting of a composite of the original two thoughts.  Similarly, three or more thoughts may merge, and affix themselves onto other thought forms, and become still newer thoughts.  There is thus no end to the number of thoughts that can be formed.   But at some certain time, one puts a stop to it.

Q. One?

A. One’s will, that is.  One wills the thought merging to stop and defines a certain conglomerate of thoughts as a single thought by identifying it.

Q. Identifying?

A.  Yes.  By naming it — by giving it a name of its own.

Q. Who is the One who does this?

A. Whoever first thought it up.  Ultimately, God.  God is the one whose will is operative in Universal Mind.   But we humans also assign names to thoughts.   After all, we were created in His image, and granted that initiative.

Q. So once the thought is fully formed, it is then identified?

A. Correct.

Q. Then what?

A. It is applied.

Q. Meaning?

A. It is sent to a thought-container where it may be put to use.

Q. Is the human brain a thought-container?

A. Yes.  It’s not the only thought-container, but it’s one of them.

Q. Then what happens to the thought?

A. It is preserved.

Q. Who does the preserving?

A. Many sentient entities have this power.  But the only one who does it perfectly is God.  Others preserve it only impermanently.

Q. Why does this remind of me of something?

A. Probably because you work with computers, and you see the parallel.

Q. The parallel?

A. Yes.  Thoughts formed in the mind often wind up in files, where they merge with other thought forms until the file is named; that is, identified.   These identified thoughts are then applied by sending them into folders.   The folders and then saved — that is, preserved, on the cloud.

Q. Is the brain then therefore a computer?

A. Yes.  It’s quite like a hard drive — a central processing unit.  

Q. But the mind is not?

A. No.  The mind, at its core, is divine.  It exists in an intangible realm of the Spirit.

Q. This is what’s called the Beyond?

A. It can be called that, yes.

Q. Why do you back off?

A. I am often hesitant to use misleading labels.  Even speaking of Universal Mind would peg me a theosophist, which I am not.

Q. You’re a Christ Follower, aren’t you?

A. I try to be.

Q. Then why does this information strike me as —

A. As?

Q. I can’t quite tell you.

A. Then I can’t quite answer.  But probably what you’re picking up is that this has nothing to do with good and evil; that is, with morality.   And morality is what is commonly associated with the Christian faith.

Q. Is that common knowledge fallacious?

A. Not at all.  But it’s only part of it.  The Word of God has a lot to do with precise language, with the meanings of names.  Words associated with the Christian faith have meanings that are often misunderstood.

Q. Like what?

A. Like sin, for example.  Most people don’t know what sin actually means, and they shy away from the concept.

Q. Another example?

A. Faith.   St. Paul says “whatsoever is not of faith is sin.”  But if one has a false idea of faith —  or of sin — that statement will be misinterpreted.

Q. When did you learn all this?

A. In the year 2012.

Q. Where were you when you learned this?

A. Berkeley.

Q. How do you know all this?

A. I’d like to save that answer for later — if you don’t mind.

The Questioner is silent. 

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Categories
Creative process Performing Arts Piano

Lighter Shades

So I was a roadie (very briefly) for a band called the Fibonaccis back in the 80’s, and one day they were playing at the Palace at Hollywood & Vine to open for the Eurythmics.

For one reason or another, they didn’t get a sufficient sound check before they went on.  The first couple songs sounded kinda sloppy.   The person sitting next to me turned to me and said: 

“Worst band since the Plastics.”

“They only got a five minute sound check,” I replied.

Seeing my badge, she seemed to suddenly realize I was in some way associated with the production.

“You wouldn’t be their manager, would you?”

“I wouldn’t admit it if I was.”

The Eurythmics came on shortly after.  I decline to describe the antics except to say that whatever was going on between Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart, I would hope they have forgiven each other by now.

Once the Eurythmics broke up, Annie Lennox went on to release an absolutely gorgeous version of the old Procol Harum tune, “A Whiter Shade of Pale.”   At that time, I was the regular pianist at a place called Gulliver’s of San Francisco.   Inspired by her version, I started playing the tune consistently during my sets.

This guy named Andrew thought the song was named “Lighter Shades.”  So he kept coming up to me and saying: “Hey, Andy – do Lighter Shades!”

Long story short, I had occasion to tell this story to Tom, the fellow who has been so kind as to come and set up the smartphone on the tripod for me so I can keep churning out these tunes for you.  Just as I got to the part where Andrew was requesting “Lighter Shades,” he happened to start recording me.   Before I knew it, I found myself going into my old version of the song that Andrew so enjoyed back in the 90’s.

Five minutes later: “It’s a take!”

Hadn’t played the tune for maybe 25 years, and well — we’ll see.  The procedure from here is that I have to wait for Tom to email the video file, then I need to upload it to my youtube channel.  

And the purpose of my telling you all this is just to let you know that I’m still on it with my New Year’s Resolution.   Probably later on today — or possibly tomorrow — you may find the shades of my piano draped a tad more lightly.

Stay tuned.  

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Categories
bible Christianity Creative process scripture

Vanguard

Between the vestibule and the altar
let the priests, the ministers of the Lord, weep
and say, “Spare your people, O Lord,
and make not your heritage a reproach,
a byword among the nations.
Why should they say among the peoples,
‘Where is their God?’”

Then the Lord became jealous for his land
and had pity on his people.
The Lord answered and said to his people,
“Behold, I am sending to you
grain, wine, and oil,
and you will be satisfied;
and I will no more make you
a reproach among the nations.

“I will remove the northerner far from you,
and drive him into a parched and desolate land,
his vanguard into the eastern sea,
and his rear guard into the western sea;
the stench and foul smell of him will rise,
for he has done great things.”

— Joel 2:17-20

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Categories
Artist Creative process Music Musical Piano

Resolve

I dug this up the other day, thought I’d lost it.  It’s “Resolve” from my concept album, Abandon.  Thought it was worth sharing, if for no other reason than you get to see me without my beanie on.   (Believe me, that’s a once-in-a-lifetime appearance.)

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Categories
Artist Creative process Musical Musical Theatre Piano

On My Own (Take Two)

Take One is on my YouTube channel, and Take Two is the result of a hunch I could do this lovely song a bit more justice.   But the visuals turned up flawed.   So I uploaded it to mp3 and posted it on my SoundCloud.   This is a song from the musical Les Miserables, with music by Claude-Michel Schönberg, and English lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer.  I adjusted the lyrics to suit my orientation, (as is common practice), then commenced to daydream thoughout the latter portion of the song.  Whoever feels like jotting down the exact minute/second spot where the daydream begins, be my guest.  

On my own
Pretending she’s beside me
All alone
I walk with her till morning
Without her
I feel her arms around me
And when I lose my way I close my eyes
And she has found me

In the rain the pavement shines like silver

All the lights are misty in the river
In the darkness, the trees are full of starlight
The trees are bare and everywhere
The streets are full of strangers

I love her

But every day I’m learning
All my life
I’ve only been pretending
Without me
Her world will go on turning
A world that’s full of happiness
That I have never known
I love her
I love her
I love her
But only on my own

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Categories
Christianity Creative process Creative Writing Playwriting Psychology

Tuesday Tuneup 60

Q. What are you doing here?

A. Thinking.

Q. About what?

A. About what to do next.

Q. What are your options?

A. Well, I can start working on one of two stories due Friday, I can continue working on my new musical, or I can do neither of the above.

Q. What will happen if you do neither of the above?

A. I’ll probably flop down on the floor from exhaustion.

Q. Have you been working too hard lately?

A. You might say so.

Q. Why?

A. Because everybody else says so.

Q. I meant, why you have been working so hard?

A. Because I’ve been hurt.

Q. What is the relationship between your working hard and your having been hurt?

A. When I’m hurt, I don’t like to experience the super-painful feelings.  So I dive into a creative project of some kind.  Something so engaging that it takes my mind off the hurt.

Q. Isn’t that unhealthy?

A. Why would it be unhealthy?

Q. Aren’t you supposed to face the hurt directly?   Walk through the pain?   Experience it fully until it has been processed?

A. Why would I be supposed to do that?

Q. Wouldn’t you be in denial if you don’t?

A. Denial of what?

Q. Denial of your feelings?

A. I don’t think so.  I already know how horribly painful the feelings are.   That’s the reason why I turn my attention away from them in the first place.

Q. In other words, your creative work is your painkiller?

A. You could put it that way, yes.

Q. How long have you been doing this?

A. I believe I was seven years old when I began to do this.

Q. What happened when you were seven?

A. Somebody hurt me.  And that same year, I learned how to play the piano, write music, write stories, and draw pictures.

Q. Who hurt you?

A. God.

Q. How could God have hurt you?

A. He hurt me in the sense that He created death.   Before I found out about death, I assumed I was going to live forever, in a very happy place, with a loving family.  Naturally, when I learned this was not the case, I was shattered.   And not only on my own behalf.  I was shattered on behalf of the entire human race.

Q. Would it be better if we all lived forever?

A. Yes.

Q. But won’t we all live forever anyway?  I mean, in heaven?

A. We’d certainly like to think so.  But apparently that statement has been the theme of much debate.

Q. Would you like to engage in such a debate at this time?

A. No, I would not.

Q. What would you like to do at this time?

A. To be honest, my heart is hugely into this new musical of mine.  When I was super-hurt yesterday, I sat down and cranked out five songs for the first scene — songs I’d already written (music only, no lyrics) and saw in a very short time how they could form the exposition and a good part of the development of an engaging new story line. And I’m psyched! This really could be the best of all the musicals, if I hunker down.

Q. How many musicals have you written?

A. Five.

Q. How many have been produced?

A. One.

Q. Why only one?

A. Because the process of trying to produce a musical is tedious, cumbersome, arduous, uncertain, stressful, frustrating, maddening, and painful.

Q. And you don’t like to face those feelings?

A. You know I don’t.

Q. So what do you do instead?

A. Usually, I write another musical.  But not immediately.  I have to let the last musical set for a while.

Q. What do you do in the meantime?  I mean, if you get hurt?

A. Depending on the level of the hurt, I either write a poem, an essay, or a song.  Unless the hurt is really really huge.

Q. What happens when the hurt is really really huge?

A. I jump the gun and dive into the next musical.   It’s the way I roll.  When my mom died, I wrote a musical.   When my wife left me years ago, I wrote a musical.

Q. And you’ve started yet another musical?   A sixth?  And you knocked out the first Scene with five songs in one morning?

A. Yes.

Q. How hurt must you have been to do something so huge!?

A. It’s not really important how hurt I was, or who hurt me, or why.  The important thing is that I’m tired.

Q. Tired?

A. Tired and weary.

Q. Tired of what?

A, Please move on to the next question.

Q. So what is this new musical going to be about?

A. The original hurt.

Q. You mean, when you were seven?

A. No.  Even more original.  I’m talking about what happened in the Garden.

Q. You mean, Eden?

A. Eden.  The Garden that we’re all unconsciously trying to return to.

garden.jpg

The Questioner is silent.  

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