Gratitude List 1652

(1) Health and self-care have been distinctly better since having finally finished a very challenging and unanticipated task. Actually got eight hours sleep the night before last, and six hours last night. Starting to run again – did three miles in the snow with my NanoSpikes. Sat down to meditate thereafter, and though I slept through most of the twenty minutes, it still seemed beneficial.

(2) Finished the first column for the five-week series on Spokane Faith and Values. Completed a draft of the second column, which I’m about to edit and submit. Grateful for the opportunity.

(3) It was nice to hear my daughter introduce me to a friend of hers yesterday by saying: “This is my dad Andy.  He was on the streets for like thirteen years and now he’s a published journalist and widely respected, and they’re producing a musical he wrote about youth homelessness.”  (A bit hyperbolic on both ends, but still nice to hear.) Grateful for a daughter who is proud of me.

(4) Big night tonight, if Cooper doesn’t get snowed out on the mountainous 30 mile drive.  Five musicians and five singers are going to be gathering with sound engineer and all kinds of recording equipment, hopefully to record “Sirens of Hope” and “Turns Toward Dawn” before we lose Cooper to a lead in a TV series.   (Asking for prayer).  

(5) Observed a very restful Sabbath on Saturday, which no doubt contributed to the unprecedented eight hours of sleep.  One thing I did do was fix the ending to Desperado.  It was a labor of love as opposed to all the stressful stuff that constitutes “work” in our high-pressure, fast-paced society.  You might check it out — we all need to let Somebody love us — before it’s too late.

The moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves too. Whatever you think you can do, or believe you can do, begin it. Action has magic, power and grace. — Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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4 thoughts on “Gratitude List 1652

  1. I always thought Sunday was considered the Sabbath, and I wondered why the difference from the Jewish Sabbath. Is there a split in when it’s observed in Christianity, or was Sunday never the Sabbath for anyone?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The short answer is that some people observe Sabbath on Sundays and some on Saturdays. I’ll now provide the long answer.

      Biblically speaking, the Sabbath is said to take place between sunset on Friday and sunset on Saturday. My personal reason for observing the Day of Rest in that time frame is a combination of the biblical precedent — that is, nowhere in the Bible does it say to observe it on Sunday or even to connect it with the timing of a Christian church service — and the observation that, if we consider the seven day per week cycle to be more-or-less arbitrary, it is intriguing that the five-day work week evolved along the lines that it did.

      Whichever day we call Friday, it is on that day that most 9 to 5’ers in the workaday world shout “TGIF!” and proceed to kick it on Friday evenings after work. By around Saturday evening or so, they’re generally ceasing to chill quite so chillishly. So I think it’s a suitable framework to observe it in that time frame, both in terms of what the Bible says, and also in terms of the evolution of the modern five day work week.

      I’ve also heard it said by clergy that it really doesn’t matter what day it is, as long as you don’t work seven days a week. That said, many pastors and church personnel (church musicians included) observe it on Saturdays because they have to work on Sundays. So all these factors play into my decision.

      Liked by 1 person

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